James Evans

Director, Knowledge Lab; Professor, Sociology, University of Chicago; Fellow, Computation Institute; Faculty Director, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Social Sciences Research Building, Room 420
(773) 702-9168

Dr. Evans is the Director of the Knowledge Lab, a Fellow in the Computation Institute, and the Faculty Director for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program. In addition to his leadership duties, Dr. Evans is a Professor in Sociology with research that focuses on the collective system of thinking and knowing, ranging from the distribution of attention and intuition, the origin of ideas and shared habits of reasoning to processes of agreement (and dispute), accumulation of certainty (and doubt), and the texture—novelty, ambiguity, topology—of human understanding. He is especially interested in innovation—how new ideas and practices emerge—and the role that social and technical institutions (e.g., the Internet, markets, collaborations) play in collective cognition and discovery. For more information, visit his homepage.


Rick Evans

Associate Director & Senior Lecturer in Computational Social Science; Director, Open Source Macroeconomics Laboratory; Fellow, Becker Friedman Institute

McGiffert House, Room 208
(773) 702-9139

Dr. Evans is Associate Director and Senior Lecturer for the Masters of Computational Social Science Program, the Director of the Open Source Macroeconomics Laboratory, and a Fellow for the Becker Friedman Institute. Dr. Evans specializes in macroeconomics, public economics, computational economics, and international macroeconomics. Rick was the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the BYU Macroeconomics and Computational Laboratory and one of the original nine members of the Utah Economic Council. ​Rick is also a former member of the Board of Directors of the Economic Club of Utah, a chapter of the National Association of Business Economics. Aside from his educational experience, Rick began his economic career as a Research Economist at Thredgold Economic Associates in Salt Lake City, providing state and national economic analysis for Zions Bank and their operations in eight western states. He has also spent time as a researcher at the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress, the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and as an economic consultant. Rick has most recently partnered with the Open Source Policy Center at the American Enterprise Institute in building its large-scale macroeconomic model for dynamic scoring and integrating it with the microsimulation static scoring model. For more information, please visit his homepage​. 


Benjamin Soltoff

Assistant Director & Assistant Instructional Professor in Computational Social Science

McGiffert House, Room 209
(773) 702-9360

Dr. Soltoff is Assistant Director & Assistant Instructional Professor in the Masters in Computational Social Science program. He is a political scientist with concentrations in American government, political methodology, and law and courts. Additionally, he has training and experience in data science, big data analytics, and policy evaluation. He completed his BA in political science at James Madison University and both his MA and PhD at Pennsylvania State University. For more information, visit his homepage.


Jon Clindaniel

Assistant Instructional Professor in Computational Social Science

McGiffert House, Room 204

Dr. Clindaniel is an Assistant Instructional Professor in the Masters in Computational Social Science program and a computational anthropologist, focused on solving difficult archaeological problems using data science techniques. He has worked on archaeological projects around the world in an effort to better understand the human past and is currently focused on deciphering symbols in the Inka khipu sign system using large archaeological databases. For more information, please visit his homepage.


Diogo Ferrari

Assistant Instructional Professor in Computational Social Science

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 406

Dr. Ferrari is an Assistant Instructional Professor in the Masters in Computational Social Science program and a Political Scientist with expertise in OECD and Latin America countries. His research interests lie on the intersection of computational social sciences, political economy, political methodology, and the micro and macro foundations political behavior. He teaches computational methods, machine learning, and Bayesian statistics with applications in political science. For more information, please visit his homepage.


Philip Waggoner

Assistant Instructional Professor in Computational Social Science

McGiffert House, Room 205
(773) 834-6907

Dr. Waggoner is an Assistant Instructional Professor in the Masters in Computational Social Science program and a political scientist applying experimental, statistical, and computational techniques to explore a variety of social science behavior. His research and teaching interests include American political decision-making, machine learning, applied statistics, and statistical computing. For more information, visit his website